Rory Lewis Photography Workshops Feedback Sept-Nov 2016

The past two months have been exceptionally busy, teaching my Portrait Masterclasses and One-to-One Workshops across the UK London, Birmingham, Glasgow, Birmingham and Dublin in the Republic of Ireland. It’s been a real pleasure to teach and pass on my knowledge of lighting, model direction, and business techniques to aspiring photographers as well as professional photographers. Many have been kind to leave me reviews and feedback below. My 2017 Workshops are now online, next year I’ll be holding workshops across the UK, USA, Europe and the Middle East Click here to View.

One-to-One Portrait Tuition Celebrity Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

One-to-One Portrait Tuition Celebrity Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

 

 Ed Flanagan VIA Reviewcentre.com

“The Master Class was not only practical and entertaining, but Rory was generous with his huge knowledge and insight built up from his study of the Great Masters in painting and their techniques for lighting and mood translated into very practical steps gained through shooting world leaders in industry, government and the arts and entrainment. All wrapped and packed into hands-on experience to facilitate the learning with and emphasis on minimum of equipment and the maximum of thought and direction.”

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

“This Master Class is a game changer for me, in my pursuit of offering my client the highest quality service possible, and I can not wait to pass on the benefits and insights I have learned from Rory’s Master Class, in the images I take going forward.”

“For anyone who is committed to raising their game to that of the Great Masters, get the insights and inspiration and learn and practice the techniques and most of all learn and practice giving direction to your seater to get the very best image possible – this is the Master Class to take.

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

Peter Jones VIA Reviewcentre.com

“I attended Rory’s Low Key Portraits course in London and was very impressed with the day. I’m delighted with the knowledge and skills I came away with.”

“To start the day, Rory gave a brief historical introduction to artists’ painting styles, how they translated to photography, and what we had to do to get great portraits.”

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

London Portrait Masterclass Rory Lewis Photography School Tuition

“Our model arrived, and the rest of the day consisted of setting up many different lighting styles using a variety of modifiers, reflectors and backgrounds. We were shown how to meter the lights and direct the shoot.”

“The portraits I came away with were easily the best studio shots I’ve ever taken, and I’ll definitely be using these techniques for my portraits from now on.”

“Rory was interesting, knowledgeable and friendly – and we were lucky to have a model who was relaxed and helpful as well as looking fantastic in our photos.”

 

 

Victoria & Albert Museum Workshop

Thank you to everyone who attended my Three Day Portrait Photography Workshop at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. It was wonderful to teach such a diverse group with several of the attendees coming from Portugal Belgium and France. The workshop was a pleasure to teach, with access to an immense collection of art to inspire the delegates throughout the three days.

 

Working with three unique models on each day the delegates were able to hone their skills, learning how to light and direct subjects for many different situations. The delegates were then able to plan and execute their own photoshoots with the models taking inspiration from the galleries collection of portraiture.

 

I’m looking forward to returning to the V&A next year to teach another workshop. If you are interested in my Photography Courses, I have a range of workshops on offer including group as well as One-to-One Sessions.

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

Victoria & Albert Museum Rory Lewis Photography Workshops

The Bookshelf of a Portrait Photographer

I’m often asked by the many delegates who attend my Photography Workshops. What Books do you recommend for the Portrait Photographer? So I thought I would write a Blog Post on the Subject. The following is a series of Books I recommend for the Budding and Established Portraitist. You will notice the majority of these listed are books on Portrait Painters. It is my opinion that the Portrait Photographer should always look at the work of the Portrait Painter. For they were around long before the photographer. Many of the lighting & posing & even retouching techniques we portrait photographers use; are inspired from Artists such as Caravaggio, Michelangelo, and DaVinci & Rembrandt.

 

Cecil Beaton Portraits & Profiles

Cecil Beaton Portraits and ProfilesCecil Beaton has been one of my favourite portrait photographers. Portraits & Profiles is a must for the Portrait Photographer. Not only does the book feature his work but also his thoughts and opinions of the stars who sat for him. The opinions taken from his private diary entires on the celebrities and historical figures who appeared in his portraits. He spent 50 years charming the rich and famous from behind the camera in order to produce an array of iconic portraits.
But now Cecil Beaton’s true and often scathing opinions on stars from Mick Jagger to Monroe have been revealed in a new book.
Cecil claimed the Rolling Stones frontman “could be a eunuch”, described one half of Grace Kelly’s face as “like a bull calf” and dismissed Elizabeth Taylor as vulgar and unladylike.
Displaying disconcerting foresight, he said of Marilyn Monroe: “It will probably end in tears.”
But despite his many waspish commentaries, the photographer was full of praise for the Queen who he described as “serene, magnetic” and “meltingly sympathetic” and her “very pretty” sister Princess Margaret. When skimming through the volume, I arrived at Cecil’s Portrait sitting with Actor David Warner, and was reminded of my own portrait sitting with David. Cecil’s descriptions of Warner still aptly describe the acting legend. Cecil Beaton: Portraits and Profiles £20.40 (Amazon)


Citizens & Kings Portraits in The Age of Revolution 1760-1830 by Sébastien Allard & Robert Rosenblum 

Citizens and Kings: Portraits in the Age of Revolution 1760-1830Every Portrait Photographer should have a copy of this book. I can’t remember when I last learned so much, this book fascinates me. Artists who have been just names are brought to life. Most of all the sculptor Houdon, whose sensitive, enlightened translation of the Greek style comes to life, and the British painter Thomas Lawrence, once a household name across Europe. What puts people off art history is the idea that it is merely about a sequence of styles – rococo to neo-classicism to Romanticism. If you want to understand the medium of portraiture this book will give you a flying start. The portraits are presented in various categories (e.g. the status portrait, the cultural portrait), preceded by short ‘bite-size’ essays that provide an insight into the context, illustrating their point with comparative works. Citizens & Kings Portraits in The Age of Revolution 1760-1830 £45.00 (Amazon)


A Face to the World: On Self-Portraits by Laura Cumming

9780007118441Focusing on the art of self-portraiture, this effortlessly engaging exploration of the lives of artists sheds fascinating light on some of the most extraordinary portraits in art history. Self-portraits always seem catch your eye. They seem to do it deliberately. Walk into any art gallery and they draw attention to themseles. Come across them in the world’s museums and you get a strange shock of recognition, rather like glimpsing your own reflection. For in picturing themselves artists reveal something far deeper than their own physical looks: the truth about how they hope to be viewed by the world, and how they wish to see themselves. In this beautifully written and lavishly illustrated book, Laura Cumming, art critic of the Observer, investigates the drama of the self-portrait, from Durer, Rembrandt and Velazquez to Munch, Picasso, Warhol and the present day. She considers how and why self-portraits look as they do and what they reveal about the artist’s innermost sense of self – as well as the curious ways in which they may imitate our behaviour in real life.Drawing on art, literature, history, philosophy and biography to examine the creative process in an entirely fresh way, Cumming offers a riveting insight into the intimate truths and elaborate fictions of self-portraiture and the lives of those who practise it. A work of remarkable depth, scope and power, this is a book for anyone who has ever wondered about the strange dichotomy between the innermost self and the self we choose to present for posterity – our face to the world. A Face to the World: On Self-Portraits £15.90 (Amazon)


Karsh Yousef – A Biography in Images by Malcolm Rogers

Karsh Yousef - A Biography in ImagesDuring his remarkable life, Yousuf Karsh, who was born in Armenia in 1908, traveled the globe to photograph subjects ranging from historical figures to anonymous farmers to steelworks. “Karsh: A Biography In Images” is a full revision of the 1996 60-year retrospective of his work and brings that popular catalogue back into print in an affordable paperback format. This new edition covers the photographer’s career with greater breadth than its previous incarnation, adding works from his early experiments and his photojournalism commissions in Canada. Karsh’s reputation as one of the most sought-after portrait photographers of the twentieth century is well established. A roll call of his subjects is a veritable who’s who of the modern age–Winston Churchill, Jacqueline Kennedy, Pablo Picasso, Walt Disney, Elizabeth Taylor and Albert Einstein, to name just a few–and this book features many of these figures, in some of the most recognized images of our time. But added to the portraits are a number of lesser-known or previously unpublished photographs–early figure studies, atmospheric views of the Ottawa theatre and scenes of wheat fields, city streets and factories across Canada. With its long autobiographical essay and extensive captions for each photo, many of them new to this edition, “Karsh: A Biography In Images” is both an elegant celebration and an indispensable overview of a life lived in photography. Karsh Yousef – A Biography in Images £29.50 (Amazon)


Caravaggio: Complete Works by Sebastian Schutze

caravaggio complete works taschenRealist revolutionary: The painter who brought the heavenly down to earth Caravaggio, or more accurately Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610), was always a name to be reckoned with.Notorious bad boy of Italian painting, the artist was at once celebrated and controversial: Violent in temper, precise in technique, a creative master, and a man on the run. This work offers a comprehensive reassessment of Caravaggio’s entire oeuvre with a catalogue of his works. Each painting is reproduced in large format, with recent, high production photography allowing for dramatic close-ups with Caravaggio’s ingenious details of looks and gestures. Five introductory chapters analyze Caravaggio’s artistic career from his early struggle to make a living, through his first public commissions in Rome, and his growing celebrity status. They look at his increasing daring with lighting and with a boundary-breaking realism which allowed even biblical events to unfold with an unprecedented immediacy before the viewer. An accompanying artist chronology follows Caravaggio’s equally tumultous personal life, tracing his history of debts, gambling, drunken brawls, and murder. Caravaggio: Complete Works by Sebastian Schutze £29.24 (Amazon)


Hans Holbein Paperback – 19 Dec 2013 by Pascal GrieneHans Holbein the Younger (1497/8 – 1543), one of the most versatile and admired painters of the Northern Renaissance, trained under his father in Augsburg and then worked for leading patrons in Switzerland before settling in England as Court Painter to Henry VIII. Holbein is my favourite portrait artist. He was a hugely ambitious artist, and even during his formative years in Lucerne and Basle designed jewellery, stained glass and woodcuts as well as paint major altarpieces and portraits. He also carried out several monumental decorative schemes for private houses and civic buildings. In all his commissions Holbein sought to rival the greatest masters of Germany and Italy – notably Durer and Mantegna – as well as Antiquity, and by the time of his visit to France in 1524 he was determined to secure a position as court painter. This, and the precarious situation he was finding himself in as a result of the Reformation’s increasing hostility to religious works, drove him to England for good in 1532, where in addition to decorative schemes and Triumphs he both drew and painted numerous unrivalled likenesses of leading courtiers, merchants and diplomats, among which is his celebrated double portrait ‘The Ambassadors’. This acclaimed, richly illustrated book by Oskar Batschmann and Pascal Griener – now available in a revised and expanded Second Edition – is a major advance in our understanding of Holbein’s contribution to European art. The authors re-examine every aspect of a remarkable career, in which they take full account of the artistic and cultural influences that affected the artist and of his friendships with leading humanists such as Erasmus and Sir Thomas More, and cast fresh light on many hitherto vexing questions and misunderstandings. Hans Holbein Paperback £20.00 (Amazon)


Low Key Portrait Masterclass London

Photography Workshops, London, Portraiture

Thank you to everyone who attended Low Key Portrait Photography Workshop at Calumet Photographic in London. It was wonderful to teach Chiaroscuro lighting, a term that is more commonly applied to Renaissance and Baroque paintings. The style was used to introduce a sense of realism into portraits, by using the contrasts between light and dark tones to create a sense of depth. More recently, it is a technique that has found its way into the world of portrait photography. Working with a professional model, the delegates where able to master lighting techniques and learn direction. One of the delegates was very kind to leave me a review below.

 

Reviews & Feedback

Lee Parsons VIA Reviewcentre.com

“I attended Rory’s Low Key Portraits course in London and was very impressed with the day. I’m delighted with the knowledge and skills I came away with.

To start the day, Rory gave a brief historical introduction to artists’ painting styles, how they translated to photography, and what we had to do to get great portraits.

Our model arrived, and the rest of the day consisted of setting up many different lighting styles using a variety of modifiers, reflectors and backgrounds. We were shown how to meter the lights and direct the shoot.

In the last part of the day, we found some portraits online and tried to recreate the lighting setup.

The portraits I came away with were easily the best studio shots I’ve ever taken, and I’ll definitely be using these techniques for my portraits from now on.

Rory was interesting, knowledgeable and friendly – and we were lucky to have a model who was relaxed and helpful as well as looking fantastic in our photos.”

National Portrait Gallery Photography Workshop

Over the May bank holiday weekend, I had the pleasure of teaching a Portrait Photography Workshop at The National Portrait Gallery in London. Taking inspiration from the Galleries Tudor & Renaissance Portrait collection and taught over two days the workshop was fully subscribed. I had the pleasure of teaching 12 delegates throughout the weekend. No stranger to the gallery i’m always popping my head through the door to gauge upon the feast of art and intrigue. I was honoured to have one of my own portraits of Actor David Warner acquired by the gallery some years ago.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

Day one began with a talk about my style of portraiture and how art has provided a great deal of inspiration in the lighting and detail of my own work. Then we moved on to talk about the work of Renaissance Artists, such as Michelangelo, DaVinci, Durer and Hans Holbein the Younger. After some refreshment, the delegates toured the galleries tudor and renaissance portraits, with a talk by myself on some of the most interesting pieces of the collection.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

After lunch it was time to learn about lighting techniques using the galleries well equipped photographic studio. The delegates practiced their technique using a light meter to setup basic one and two light Renaissance Chiaroscuro Lighting with our first model Teo Pendle. After lighting skills where honed, I demonstrated direction and how to create different emotions and moods. The delegates then took it in turn to capture a varied collection of portraits illustrating different sides of Teo’s character.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

Day two began with a review of all the delegates portraits from day one. We then recapped on the lighting techniques and skills. The delegates then worked in groups to re-create versions of the renaissance portraits in the gallery.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

After lunch it was time to work with our Second model Laure O’Rourke, the delegates working in groups visited the gallery to plan a series of portraits using the collection as inspiration. Then taking it in turn to re-create their own versions of portraits with Laura. Shoots completed, I reviewed all the portraits captured, and gave individual feedback on lighting and direction.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

The course was a wonderful success, packing in as much as I possibly could over two days, the Delegates walked away with a new appreciation of art and photographic skills. Capturing their own collection of portraiture. It was fascinating to see everyones unique style and approach to the practical photography session. If you are interested in my photography workshops in the UK or USA, please take a look at my Photography Course Page. I will be returning to teach at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017 and i’m already planning my next workshop.

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer  28th & 29th May 2016

National Portrait Gallery Workshop, Rory Lewis Photographer 28th & 29th May 2016

Lastolite Collapsable Backdrops

Those of you who follow my blog and twitter feed, see me using Lastolite Collapsable Backdrops on the majority of my Portrait Sittings. As a travelling portraitist collapsible backgrounds are a quick and easy solution. They take seconds to set up and pack away making them equally convenient to pop-open in offices & clients homes.

Harry Groener Rory Lewis Photographer

Harry Groener Rory Lewis Photographer

I enjoy shooting portraits with the collapsible backdrops. As a one man band, I can easily accomplish the background set-ups by myself since they fold and unfold like a giant reflector. They are easy to carry on public transport, which is a blessing. The majority of my sittings take place in London. As a regular passinger on the London Underground they are easy to stow in a large suitcase.

 

As well as single sided backdrops, Lastolite offer reversible backdrops giving you more options. The backdrops I most frequently us are the Black/White, White/Light Gray. I also utilise the dyed/muslin backdrops Wyoming/MississippiVirginia /Kentucky. Muslin backdrops give you the choice of colours and patterns.

Left (Virginia Dyed) Capt Reilly Royal Irish Regiment, Right (Wyoming Dyed) Actor Brent Spiner

Left (Virginia Dyed) Capt Reilly Royal Irish Regiment, Right (Wyoming Dyed) Actor Brent Spiner

What are Dyed/Muslin backdrops you may ask; well they date back to the 17th century. They where mostly used in dressmaking back then, as it’s a breathable fabric that drapes niceley. But it also holds dye and paint very well, which moved it into the world of theater, and, eventually, photography. I know what you are thinking, your mind is going back to your days at school, when the school photographer would capture your portrait against an awful dyed backdrop. I thought the same thing, but after looking at the work of the portrait artists of old, Muslins where widely used. Utilising the right lighting and mood these backdrops can help unleash your creativity.

Lastolite Black/White Left Actress Helen Bench, Right Actor William Shatner

Lastolite Black/White Left Actress Helen Bench, Right Actor William Shatner

I mostly use the Black/White Collapsible, I love shooting on black so much and this makes my life very easy. The black is especially handy for when I want a completely dark background that has no light reflection. Most of the locations I shoot in are not ideal, sometimes their is a little too much daylight I can’t block out! I find the backdrop absorbs light from the strobe far better than seamless backdrop paper which in my experience seems to catch the light.

 

Lastolite Urban BackdropsLastolite also offer a selection of Urban Backgrounds bringing the outdoor look, indoors; with a wide selection available. Urban Backgrounds help to save time and costs especially when you trying to find the right location for you portrait photoshoot. (Left Lastolite Urban Collapsible 1.5 x 2.1m Tarnished Metal/Container) The uncontrollable weather and the risk of distractions in the background no longer present challenges. Whether in a studio, or a client’s home, you can create the outdoor look in any location. In conclusion, I couldn’t imagine going back to the days of carrying roles of seamless backdrop paper around, or hunting for a suitable location and in turn praying for good weather.

 

It is also worth mentioning if you are going to invest in Lastolite Collapsable backdrop system. Make sure you purchase the Magnetic Background Support Kit. The Kit enables photographers to quickly and easily attach any collapsible backgrounds with a steel rim to a traditional lighting stand. The background can be attached to the support at a comfortable height. It is also quick and easy to switch backgrounds; simply pull one off and snap another on.

 

Nikon D810 Review

This week I had the chance to give the Nikon D810 a test drive on a portrait photoshoot with Actor Toby Jones. Normally a Canon 5DMKIII chap, it took me a few moments to get used to the Nikon’s functionality once again. The camera boasts some very impressive features. With a simple idea in mind, Nikon set out to challenge its previous model the D800 with the impressive specifications of the D810; with a welcome one-stop boost in ISO sensitivity; an added frame-per-second in continuous shooting modes; full HD 1080/60p video recording, up from 30p; extended battery life; a RAW SIZE S format; and other improvements to AF performance, colour balancing, and overall handling. Nikon D810 ReviewThe overall shape and weight of the D810 is similar compared to its predecessor the D800, but slight updates to how some of the rear and top buttons were set within the control scheme was a bit confusing at first. The AF and AE Lock button and AF On button now protrude slightly more from the body, and the AE metering area selector has been moved to the top of the left-hand dial, as opposed to surrounding the AE/AF Lock button.

Nikon D810 Review

I grew to appreciate how certain controls were more easily accessible. Additionally, I should point out that the rear LCD monitor, which remains a 3.2” screen, has an improved resolution of 1,229,000 dots, and can now be color-configured to your own preferences. In comparison to the D800/D800E, it’s quite a noticeable difference. The imagery appears sharper and brighter for more precise evaluation and live view monitoring.

 

The D810 also features a slightly deeper grip and a bit more tack to the rubberised covering, which seemed to make it a somewhat easier to handle and comfortably switch between vertical and horizontal shooting modes. This new model also felt a bit tighter; the shutter noise is a little softer, switching between settings and navigating throughout the menu was faster, image processing took less time, and things just feel better all-around.

Actor Toby Jones, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Actor Toby Jones, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

After adapting to the slightly modified layout of the new body, I set out to photograph Toby, even without viewing my imagery on a computer, I felt that same excitement I did the first time I worked with a Canon 5DMKIII. The large 36.3MP stills offer a great sense of visual depth and edge acutance that is immediately visible on the rear screen, and still holds true when finally viewing on a good computer monitor. The new OLPF-less design certainly adds to this increased sense of sharpness, but at a minute level that isn’t immediately detectable.

 

Actor Toby Jones, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Actor Toby Jones, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Colour and tonal representation, along with the ability to boast such a wide dynamic range, was also a strong point of the initial D800-series. Again, the D810 seems to edge out its predecessors in the way it handles a broad color gamut and scenes with increased contrast. Aided by tools such as the highlight-weighted metering, the D810 is able to preserve greater detail in both the highlights and shadows. When working with this metering mode, though, I noticed that my JPEGs all appeared slightly underexposed by about 1/3 to 2/3 a stop; seemingly to ensure highlight detail is retained in the RAW files.

 

When the Nikon D800 dropped two years ago it instantly became known for its absurdly high-resolution sensor and excellent image quality. The ability to crop zoom or downsample and retain a high-resolution final image is still something that is unrivaled among full-frame DSLRs. The D810 doesn’t alter what has proven to be a winning formula, but enhances it with improved processing and some updated hardware. Like other recent full-frame cameras like the D610 and D4S, Nikon isn’t out to fix what isn’t broken. The D810 still offers a very high-resolution sensor, but it shores up some of the weakest parts of the D800’s resume. It’s swifter, it has better high ISO image quality, and it offers a better all-around feature set to videographers who want to shoot video with a wonderful 36-megapixel sensor.

Weekend Portrait Masterclass Feedback

Thank you to everyone who attended Weekend Portrait Masterclass over the bank holiday. It was wonderful to welcome everyone to my Liverpool Photography Studio. The course was a wonderful success, if you would like to book a place, I will be holding four more Weekend Portrait Masterclasses this year in Liverpool, London, Edinburgh & Dublin.

Work with Professional Models Test using State of the Art Equipment

Morning of the first day delegates enjoyed a talk on the medium of portraiture, then after coffee and refreshments it was time to learn low key lighting with our first model Alexandra. After lunch (provided) we moved on to beauty portraiture, learning high key lighting techniques. Into the afternoon delegates worked with our Second Model, Actor and Martial Arts Expert Kru Lundy. Learning how to direct a male subject and use reflectors & softboxes.

Work with Professional Models Test using State of the Art Equipment

On the second day delegates had a full schedule ahead of them. Starting with a fashion portrait photoshoot featuring our first model Alexandra, learning how to use gels to create a vivid portrait. After lunch (provided) delegates worked with a real soldier Major John Melville to create an epic low key portrait in the style of the renaissance artists. Finishing off the second day delegates expanded on high key lighting techniques with our third model Peter Adediran.

 

Intermediate Portrait Lighting

This week I have put together a collection of helpful portrait lighting diagrams; along with all the equipment used to capture them. Choosing the right equipment for your photoshoots can make your life much easier.  Don’t forget a good light meter is essential, you will be surprised, I have taught a great deal of budding photographers in my workshops, and many have never used a light meter. I recommend the Sekonic L-308S , it’s simple to use and will ensure accuracy in your metering.

 

Black Backdrop Rim Lighting:

Rim Lighting Portrait London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Equipment List:

Camera Fuji XT1 & 18-135mm Lens Kit 

Lighting X3 Bowens 400 RX Strobes

Backdrop Black 2.72M Seamless Backdrop Paper

X2 Strip 100 Softboxes 

x1 21″ White Beauty Dish

X2 Matthews Flags 18×24″


Location Portrait:

Location Portrait Lighting Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer

Equipment List:

Camera Mamiya Leaf Credo 40 Digital back with Mamiya 645DF

Backdrop Lastolite 5′ x 6′ (1.5mx1.8m) Collapsible Backdrop Grey/White 

Lighting Profoto B2 250 AirTTL To-Go Kit 

Profoto Off Camera Flash Softbox 2″ Octa (60 cm) 

Profoto 80cm Reflector – Black/White

Profoto 80cm Reflector – White/Silver


Contour Lighting

Body Contour Portrait Lighting

Equipment List:

Camera Nikon D750 Digital SLR Camera with 24-120mm f/4G ED VR

Backdrop Mandarin 2.72m x 11m Seamless 

Lighting x3 Bowens Gemini 500 Pro Flash Heads

x1 21″ White Beauty Dish

x2 Bowens 100 Lumiair Softboxes  x2 Egg Crates