Queensland Musuem Dan Keighran VC

On the 10th November 2018, the Queensland Musuem, South Brisbane Australia has launched a new Anzac Legacy Gallery. Examining the First World War as a catalyst for change in the state. The first half of the exhibition focuses on the War, but the second is about Queensland since the War. Including several contemporary  military service stories. These stories, include the very brave Corporal Dan Keighran VC. Back in 2016 I captured Dan’s portrait in London as part of my Victoria and George Cross Project. The museum approached me a few months ago, requesting to feature the portrait in the exhibition. I was delighted to accept their offer, as a  wonderful opportunity opened up to show my work in Australia for the first time. You can view Dan’s Victoria Cross citation below and a few snaps of the installation sent to me by the Museum’s Senior Curator Liz Bissell.

 

(Limtied Edition Prints fo Dan Keighran VC’s portrait also available on the below link). 

 

Daniel Alan Keighran VC Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer 2016

Daniel Alan Keighran VC Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer 2016

Dan Keighran VC Citation,


For the most conspicuous acts of gallantry and extreme devotion to duty in action in circumstances of great peril at Derapet, Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, as part of the Mentoring Task Force One on Operation SLIPPER.

 

Corporal Keighran deployed to Afghanistan in February 2010 with the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. On 24 August 2010, Corporal Keighran was a member of a partnered fighting patrol with soldiers of the Afghan National Army’s 1st Kandak, 4th Brigade, 205th (Hero) Corps, which was engaged by a numerically superior and coordinated enemy attack from multiple firing points in three separate locations. The attack was initiated by a high volume of sustained and accurate machine-gun and small-arms fire which pinned down the combined Australian and Afghan patrol and caused a loss of momentum.

 

In the early stages of the attack, and upon realising that the forward elements of the patrol needed effective fire support, Corporal Keighran and another patrol member moved under sustained and accurate enemy fire to an exposed ridgeline to identify enemy locations and direct the return fire of both Australian and Afghan machine guns. On reaching this position and with complete disregard for his own wellbeing, Corporal Keighran deliberately drew enemy fire by leaving the limited cover he had and moved over the ridgeline in order to positively identify targets for the machine gunners of the combined patrol. After identifying some of the enemy firing positions, Corporal Keighran, under persistent enemy fire continued to lead and mentor his team and move around the ridge to both direct the fire of the Afghan and Australian machine gunners and to move them to more effective firing positions.

 

As the intensity of enemy fire grew, Corporal Keighran returned to the crest of the ridgeline to identify targets and adjust the fire of Australian Light Armoured Vehicles. His actions resulted in the effective suppression of enemy firing points, which assisted in turning the fight in the favour of the combined patrol. Moving to a new position, Corporal Keighran deliberately and repeatedly again exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to assist in target identification and the marking of the forward line of troops for fire support elements whilst simultaneously engaging the enemy. Realising that the new position provided a better location for the patrol’s joint fire controller, Corporal Keighran moved over 100 metres across exposed parts of the ridgeline, attracting a high volume of accurate enemy fire, to locate and move the fire controller to the new position. He then rose from cover again to expose his position on four successive occasions, each movement drawing more intense fire than the last in order to assist in the identification of a further three enemy firing points that were subsequently engaged by fire support elements. During one of these occasions, when his patrol sustained an Australian casualty, Corporal Keighran with complete disregard for his own safety, left his position of cover on the ridgeline to deliberately draw fire away from the team treating the casualty. Corporal Keighran remained exposed and under heavy fire while traversing the ridgeline, in order to direct suppressing fire and then assist in the clearance of the landing zone to enable evacuation of the casualty.

 

Corporal Keighran’s acts of the most conspicuous gallantry to repeatedly exposed himself to accurate and intense enemy fire, thereby placing himself in grave danger, ultimately enabled the identification and suppression of enemy firing positions by both Australian and Afghan fire support elements. These deliberate acts of exceptional courage in circumstances of great peril were instrumental in permitting the withdrawal of the combined Australian and Afghan patrol with no further casualties. His valour is in keeping with the finest traditions of the Australian Army and the Australian Defence Force.


(Limtied Edition Prints fo Dan Keighran VC’s portrait also available on the below link). 

 

Digital Photography Magazine Column Feature

Thank you to Digital Photographer Magazine for inviting me to write this months Pro Column. My topic for this months article, my portrait sitting with actor Sir Patrick Stewart. I hope you enjoy it, feedback is most welcome.

Rory Lewis Photographer Digital Photography Magazine Feature

Rory Lewis Photographer Digital Photography Magazine Feature

The Chiefs of the Defence Staff

The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces and the most senior uniformed military adviser to the Secretary of State for Defence and the Prime Minister. The Chief of the Defence Staff is based at the Ministry of Defence and works alongside the Permanent Under Secretary, the Ministry’s senior civil servant. The Chief of the Defence Staff is the British equivalent position of what in NATO and the European Union is known as the Chief of Defence.

 

Throughout my career, I have been commissioned to photograph four consecutive Chiefs. From these sittings with senior military figures I have learned a great deal about capturing leadership. I have found myself directing prominent individuals who are used to themselves giving direction to the men and women they command. I have relished the chance to take responsibility and ownership for these historical images of senior military leaders. These portraits will stand the test of time.

Field Marshal Charles Guthrie, Baron Guthrie of Craigiebank, GCB, LVO, OBE, DL

Field Marshal Guthrie, Baron Guthrie of CraigiebankGCBLVOOBEDL was Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, from 1994 to 1997 and Chief of the Defence Staff from 1997 until his retirement in 2001.

Guthrie’s military career saw service with the Welsh Guards and the Special Air Service; he was closely involved in military operations in Northern Ireland and provided advice to the British Government during the Bosnian War and the Kosovo War.

In 2012 Lord Guthrie was handed his Field Marshal’s Baton, in recognition of his remarkable leadership and service by Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II.

General Sir John Nicholas Houghton GCB, CBE, ADC

General Nicholas Houghton, Baron Houghton of Richmond, GCB, CBE, ADC Gen, former Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) of the British Armed Forces. He was appointed CDS in July 2013, following the retirement of General Sir David Richards. He served as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, the Green Howards in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and later became Commander of the 39th Infantry Brigade in Northern Ireland. He deployed as Senior British Military Representative and Deputy Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq during the Iraq War. Later, he became Chief of Joint Operations at Permanent Joint Headquarters and served as Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff until assuming the position of CDS. Houghton retired from the British Army in July 2016, and was succeeded as CDS by Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach.

 

The Generals sitting took place in 2014. On many occasions the General has been Photographed and Painted in his Ceremonial Dress Uniform and wanted to step away from the ceremonial image. General Houghton is regarded as “The Soldiers, Soldier” and Preferred to be Photographed in his Combat Uniform. Shot at at a slightly higher angle, I really wanted to Capture the General’s commanding presence, and with a combination of subtle lighting the images turned out really well.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach KCB, CBE, ADC, DL

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach, GBE, KCB, ADC, DL is a senior Royal Air Force officer. After training as a navigator, Peach commanded IX (Bomber) Squadron and then became Deputy Station Commander RAF Bruggen. He was deployed as NATO Air Commander (Forward) in Kosovo in 2000. He went on to be Chief of Defence Intelligence in 2006, Chief of Joint Operations in 2009 and the first Commander of Joint Forces Command in December 2011 before being appointed Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff in May 2013. Peach succeeded General Sir Nick Houghton as Chief of the Defence Staff on 14 July 2016. He succeeded General Petr Pavel as Chairman of the NATO Military Committee on 29 June 2018.

 

Bathed in the illustrious history of Whitehall, we conducted the session in the MOD Building – a perfect location to capture the experience, rank and authority of the subject. Employing direct eye contact with the lens, full military garb and a solemn posture, the frame urges the viewer to look into his eyes, demanding the utmost respect his office dictates.

General Sir Nicholas Carter, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

General Sir Nicholas Carter, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Gen is a Kenyan-born senior British Army officer. He served as commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, Royal Green Jackets in which role he was deployed to Bosnia in 1998 and Kosovo in 1999. After service in Afghanistan, he took command of 20th Armoured Brigade in 2004 and commanded British forces in Basra. He was subsequently appointed General Officer Commanding 6th Division, which was deployed to Afghanistan with Carter as Commander ISAFRegional Command South, before he became Director-General Land Warfare. After that he became Deputy Commander Land Forces in which role he was the main architect of the Army 2020 concept. After a tour as Deputy Commander, International Security Assistance Force, he assumed the position of Commander Land Forces in November 2013. In September 2014, he became head of the British Army as Chief of the General Staff succeeding General Sir Peter Wall. In June 2018 he succeeded Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach as Chief of the Defence Staff.

 

The General was in need of a portrait to be placed on the wall of former army leaders. The sitting was indeed very historical as the portrait will be viewed by the General’s successors for many years to come. My aim was to capture the General, as the man he is, a leader, no vanity, no pomp of the dress uniform, tall and proud. I’m looking forward to seeing how the portrait is received.

 

Relying once again on my confidence as a portrait photographer, I was able to bring to the sittings the direction needed. This confidence is key to any of my sittings, both military and in other fields where I need to capture leaders: from business to government. I take the time to produce the finest Portraits, which enable me to create images that display the character, expression, personalty and mood of each sitter. Using expert lighting techniques, direction and inventive scenarios, I will create the very best in Portraiture. I’m now stranger to working with Celebrities, CEO’s, Politicians, Soldiers, Musicians and Professionals.

 

Alternatively To Book Editorial, Political or any other forms of Portraiture. Please Email Me or Call +44 07717 139 637  For Availability. Sessions available London Studios & UK Wide and in Los Angeles (CA) Several Times Per Year.

 

 

Peter Van Norden Actors Headshots Los Angeles

 (Rory Lewis)

Thank you to Peter Van Norden for arranging his Actors Headshots at the Glendale Studio in Los Angeles. He is an actor, known for The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear (1991), Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985) and The Stand (1994).

 

It was a real pleasure to work with Peter, an exceptionally talented actor. Throughout the session we worked on Commercial and Theatrical Headshots. I hope to have the chance to see Peter on stage at some point in the near future.

 

RORY LEWS BRITISH, Headshot Photographer to the Stars of Stage & Screen, Recommended by Backstage Casting. Based in Los Angeles (CA) able to shoot at studios in Glendale.

“Positively BRILLIANT photographer. Beautiful headshots and portraitures. Works of art. Rory and Alexandra are great folks, a pleasure to work with, make the experience fun and painless – and the results are nothing short of superb! Couldn’t recommend them more highly.” (Peter Van Norden)

 (Rory Lewis)

 (Rory Lewis)

 (Rory Lewis)

Portrait of Britain 2018

Portrait of Britain is presented by British Journal of Photography. Photographer Rory Lewis portrait of British Army Soldier Warrant Officer Class 2 Deborah Penny. Deborah serving 30 years in the British Army’s Royal Logistic Corps as a Bomb disposal expert; made Army history as the first transgender Soldier to serve in the front line.

 

Captured for Soldiery (British Army Portraits), has been selected to appear in a Nationwide Exhibition. Shortlisted from 13,000 entires, 100 Portraits of the exhibition will go live on Saturday 1st September 2018. Portrait of Britain is being billed as the UK’s biggest exhibition of portraiture. Being exhibited across JCDecaux’s nationwide screens, appearing in public places throughout the UK. The portrait also features in the Portrait of Britain book, available from Amazon. This constitutes Rory’s 2nd win of the Portrait of Britain over two years.

 

British Journal of Photography Portrait of Britain Rory Lewis Deborah Penny

Warrant Officer Class 2 Deborah Penny London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis, Military British Army

Simon Bainbridge, editorial director of the British Journal of Photography, said: “The portraits celebrate the unique heritage and diversity of modern Britain, as much as its thriving photography culture and the myriad styles and approaches they employ in their work. Yet, as much as our tribal allegiances are on show in many of the photographs, each image reminds us that, above all, we are a nation of individuals.”

 

Press


Liverpool Echo Rory Lewis 31st August 2018

Portrait of Britain Liverpool Echo Rory Lewis 31st August 2018

 

Professional Headshots Henry VIII & Napoleon Knew The Importance of Image

Actors, Authors, SoldiersMusicians, Opera Singers, Professionals, DoctorsCEO’S, Directors you all need a good headshot, a single image to convey your complexities, personality and professionalism.

Ask yourself does your Headshot/Portrait Tell your Story?”

“A picture shows me at a glance what it takes dozens of pages of a book to expound.” Ivan Turgenev

 

Los Angeles Military Portrait Photographer (Army, Navy, Airforce) Portrait Photography

With the growth of Social Media, our online appearance can be just as important; possibly in a modern context even more important than our personal appearance.

Sonya Balmores LA Actors Headshots (Rory Lewis Photographer)

Here a few historical examples for you. Henry VIII, knew the importance of his professional Appearance. When we think of Henry VIII we think of a gigantic, defiant bull like figure. In reality this wasn’t true, it was an image created by the Artist Hans Holbein in 1537.

Henry VIII Napoleon

Likewise Napoleon from the Beginning of his career appreciated the importance of imposing his image upon the world through the best artists available.

 

“A Picture is worth a Thousand Words” (Napoleon)”

David Cameron Portrait Sitting, Rory Lewis Portrait Photographer London

So why should we think any different to Henry VIII& Napoleon. If they had Social Media how would they represent themselves to the public?

 

Posting amateur images of yourself taken from a night out on your Linkedin Profile won’t make you look serious to potential employers and clients. Nor represent you as a giant in your profession.

Your image must reflect your attention to detail and professionalism. You only get one chance to make a good impression. Good Head Shots immediately convey that you are serious and focused.

Captain Buddhi Bhandari British Army Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

I have developed my own unique style of working with headshot clients ensuring their photographic headshot experience is an enjoyable; relaxed session to create the best image for your profile.

With Over 14 Years Experience and using direction and inventive ‘scenarios, I can easily encourage you to express yourself, creating natural, approachable headshots that get you noticed. Don’t let your image suffer; become a PROFESSIONAL GIANT! I have a number of Affordable Packages, available in London and Los Angeles.

 

My Services Click Here

Photo Professional Magazine

Thank you to Photo Professional Magazine, featuring Portraitist which opens on 1st August 2018, at Wex Photo & Video London. The article features my portrait of Actor Rufus Sewell, captured in Los Angeles. The portrait among over 30 others will hang until 25th September 2018.

 

Professional Photo Magazine

H.R.H Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO, KStJ, CD Portrait Sitting

H.R.H Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO, KStJ, CD is a member of the British Royal Family. He is a paternal first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II, being a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. His Royal Highness commissioned a portrait at the London Studio. The Prince does have an uncanny resemblance to his great grand father Edward VII, in researching his lineage I did come across a portrait which gave me a great deal of inspiration for the sitting. I decided on a profile shot similar to that of Edward VII’s ceremonial portraits. Whilst still maintaining a harshness of lighting. Left (King Edward VII in state robes, about 1905W. & D. Downey) Prince Michael was born during the Second World War on 4 July 1942, at Coppins, Iver, Buckinghamshire. He was the third child of Prince George, Duke of Kent, who was a younger brother of King George VI. At the time of his birth Michael was seventh in the line of Succession to the British throne.

 

Being Colonel of the Kings Royal Hussars, for the first set Prince Michael adorned his regimental uniform. Opting for the Crimson backdrop, I wanted to achieve two things. The first, red is the colour of Royalty, the second crimson is the colour of the Kings Royal Hussars trousers and peak cap.

 

This distinctive feature, which is unique in the British Army, derives from the honour accorded to the 11th Hussars by Prince Albert. The regiment, then based at Canterbury, formed the escort for the Prince from his arrival at Dover, en route to his wedding in London. The Prince so impressed with the bearing and turnout of the troops, he ordered that they should henceforth wear his livery as a mark of distinction.

H.R.H Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO, KStJ, CD London Royal Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

For the second set, His Royal Highness changed into his Household frock coat. Opting for a black backdrop, and harsher lighting, I wanted to create a more ambient and vivid portrait. Using intense chiaroscuro to add both mystery and dutiful emotion. This my first Royal portrait sitting, was a smooth and enjoyable experience. To capture history and tradition are two aims I wanted to achieve as a portraitist, in this special sitting I believe I achieved these goals.

H.R.H Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO, KStJ, CD London Royal Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

 

Lieutenant General James Bashall CBE Portrait Sitting

Delighted to work with Lieutenant General James Bashall CBE, who commissioned a military portrait sitting at his Headquarters in Aldershot. A tall and imposing man, Lieutenant General Bashall was a hero of the Iraq War. He commanded the 1st Mechanised Brigade in Basra, in 2007.

 

Bashall’s military career had also seen him commanding the 2nd Battalion Parachute Regiment (‘2 Para’) in Afghanistan.  The General is one of the British Army’s most experienced combat commanders, justifiably proud of his service with the Parachute Regiment. I directed Bashall to pose side-on, elegantly displaying his paratrooper wings. I also opted for a low angle, to emphasise both pride and duty.

 

Based in London Rory Lewis is the UK’s foremost Military Portraitist Photographer, who is regularly commissioned to photograph high profile Military Officers for all three branches of the Military Army, RAF & Royal Navy. Portraits are very important to military personal, to be captured in Uniform looking ones best and in full finery can fill one with pride for the service. Rory Lewis Photographer offers a comprehensive service to Members of the Armed Forces, RAF, Royal Navy and Army who are looking to capture a professional portrait. Read More…..

Lieutenant General James Bashall CBE Commander Home Command (Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis)

Lieutenant General James Bashall CBE Commander Home Command (Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis)

Captain Buddhi Bhandari MVO Portrait Sitting

SoldieryBritish Army Portraits, has given me a great deal of exposure. Since the completion of the project I have been offering portraits to Military and Police personnel. One of my latest commissions took place with Gurkha Engineer, Captain Buddhi Bhandari MVO, who recently won the Royal Victorian Order for brave actions during the recent Nepal Earthquake.

 

Capturing a portrait of a living hero gave me the chance to record Buddhi, in this another glorious chapter in Gurkha history. If you are a member of the Armed Forces or the Police Services, please don’t hesitate to contact me. Offering portrait sittings in London, Liverpool and Edinburgh.

 

British Army Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

British Army Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis