Queensland Musuem Dan Keighran VC

On the 10th November 2018, the Queensland Musuem, South Brisbane Australia has launched a new Anzac Legacy Gallery. Examining the First World War as a catalyst for change in the state. The first half of the exhibition focuses on the War, but the second is about Queensland since the War. Including several contemporary  military service stories. These stories, include the very brave Corporal Dan Keighran VC. Back in 2016 I captured Dan’s portrait in London as part of my Victoria and George Cross Project. The museum approached me a few months ago, requesting to feature the portrait in the exhibition. I was delighted to accept their offer, as a  wonderful opportunity opened up to show my work in Australia for the first time. You can view Dan’s Victoria Cross citation below and a few snaps of the installation sent to me by the Museum’s Senior Curator Liz Bissell.

 

(Limtied Edition Prints fo Dan Keighran VC’s portrait also available on the below link). 

 

Daniel Alan Keighran VC Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer 2016

Daniel Alan Keighran VC Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer 2016

Dan Keighran VC Citation,


For the most conspicuous acts of gallantry and extreme devotion to duty in action in circumstances of great peril at Derapet, Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, as part of the Mentoring Task Force One on Operation SLIPPER.

 

Corporal Keighran deployed to Afghanistan in February 2010 with the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment. On 24 August 2010, Corporal Keighran was a member of a partnered fighting patrol with soldiers of the Afghan National Army’s 1st Kandak, 4th Brigade, 205th (Hero) Corps, which was engaged by a numerically superior and coordinated enemy attack from multiple firing points in three separate locations. The attack was initiated by a high volume of sustained and accurate machine-gun and small-arms fire which pinned down the combined Australian and Afghan patrol and caused a loss of momentum.

 

In the early stages of the attack, and upon realising that the forward elements of the patrol needed effective fire support, Corporal Keighran and another patrol member moved under sustained and accurate enemy fire to an exposed ridgeline to identify enemy locations and direct the return fire of both Australian and Afghan machine guns. On reaching this position and with complete disregard for his own wellbeing, Corporal Keighran deliberately drew enemy fire by leaving the limited cover he had and moved over the ridgeline in order to positively identify targets for the machine gunners of the combined patrol. After identifying some of the enemy firing positions, Corporal Keighran, under persistent enemy fire continued to lead and mentor his team and move around the ridge to both direct the fire of the Afghan and Australian machine gunners and to move them to more effective firing positions.

 

As the intensity of enemy fire grew, Corporal Keighran returned to the crest of the ridgeline to identify targets and adjust the fire of Australian Light Armoured Vehicles. His actions resulted in the effective suppression of enemy firing points, which assisted in turning the fight in the favour of the combined patrol. Moving to a new position, Corporal Keighran deliberately and repeatedly again exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to assist in target identification and the marking of the forward line of troops for fire support elements whilst simultaneously engaging the enemy. Realising that the new position provided a better location for the patrol’s joint fire controller, Corporal Keighran moved over 100 metres across exposed parts of the ridgeline, attracting a high volume of accurate enemy fire, to locate and move the fire controller to the new position. He then rose from cover again to expose his position on four successive occasions, each movement drawing more intense fire than the last in order to assist in the identification of a further three enemy firing points that were subsequently engaged by fire support elements. During one of these occasions, when his patrol sustained an Australian casualty, Corporal Keighran with complete disregard for his own safety, left his position of cover on the ridgeline to deliberately draw fire away from the team treating the casualty. Corporal Keighran remained exposed and under heavy fire while traversing the ridgeline, in order to direct suppressing fire and then assist in the clearance of the landing zone to enable evacuation of the casualty.

 

Corporal Keighran’s acts of the most conspicuous gallantry to repeatedly exposed himself to accurate and intense enemy fire, thereby placing himself in grave danger, ultimately enabled the identification and suppression of enemy firing positions by both Australian and Afghan fire support elements. These deliberate acts of exceptional courage in circumstances of great peril were instrumental in permitting the withdrawal of the combined Australian and Afghan patrol with no further casualties. His valour is in keeping with the finest traditions of the Australian Army and the Australian Defence Force.


(Limtied Edition Prints fo Dan Keighran VC’s portrait also available on the below link). 

 

National Army Museum Portrait Photography Workshop

29 September 2018, 10.00am – 4.00pm

Photographer Rory Lewis leads this practical full-day course on portrait photography.

Portraits from Soldiery Rory Lewis Photographer 2018

Inspired by his recent exhibition, Soldiery – which featured 278 portraits of British Army soldiers – Rory Lewis leads this course focused on developing your skills in portrait photography.

 

Rory’s fun and practical learning techniques and use of professional models will help you hone your skills and add to your photography portfolio. Aimed at both amateur and more experienced photographers, the course will cover studio flash lighting, the effect of soft boxes, umbrellas, snoots and reflectors. You’ll learn what a light’s main function is and how lighting affects the final image.

 

Refreshments and lunch are included in the cost of the course.

Click Here to Book

£149.00

Programme

10.00am – Welcome and talk by Rory Lewis on The Medium of Portraiture

10.45am – Refreshments

11.00am – High key portraiture

12.30pm – Lunch

1.15pm – Vivid chiaroscuro portraiture

2.00pm – Low key portraiture (Rembrandt lighting, split and short lighting)

4.00pm – Closing remarks from Rory Lewis

National Army Museum Photography Workshop with Rory Lewis

1st Battalion, The Rifles Portrait Sittings

Soldiery (British Army Portraits) was one of the most challenging projects of my career. Now the exhibitions are completed I can take the opportunity to publish a selection of portraits from the sittings.

The subjects of my first photoshoot, where the Soldiers of 1st Battalion, The Rifles. I discovered little has changed since the Napoleonic Wars. The Rifles, are still at the forefront of battle, trained as marksmen. They don’t carry a flag. Instead, their Battle Honours are carried on Parade uniforms.

Lieutenant Baldwin 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

Captain Massey 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

Each Rifleman is entrusted with the Battle Honours of the regiment, wearing a representative selection of Battle Honours. On the Belt Plate there are 34 Battle Honours represented, inherited from the forming and antecedent regiments.

Sergeant Bugle Major Lewis 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

The bugle has traditionally been used in the past both to communicate with, and to direct Riflemen. The bugle was adopted for use in the 18th century, as it was light and easy to use unlike the cumbersome drum. It’s clear note could be heard for up to three miles whereas a drum signal became indistinct. It was originally an ox bugle but later made in silver which gave a clearer note.

Rifleman Woods 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

The bugle is central to The Rifles’ musical traditions, but music has been carried forward and is still used today. Daily routine in the battalions is marked by bugle calls, and The Rifles sound, rather than beat, Retreat. They have gained a sort of fame over the years, largely due to the ‘Sharpe’ series.

Rifleman Armour 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

Upon arrival at Chepstow, where The Rifles are based, I was greeted by a young officer no more than 23-years- of-age. It was here I found myself behind the lens for the first time, photographing soldiers as young as 18. It’s a humbling and awe-inspiring thought, to truly realise how young many of these soldiers are, and the careers they will go on to have.

Captain Axford 1st Battalion The Rifles (Rory Lewis Photographer 2018) Military Portrait Photographer (London)

Lieutenant Commander Trewinnard-Boyle Portrait Sitting

From a recent portrait commission with Royal Navy Officer Lieutenant Commander Trewinnard-Boyle. Who arranged a portrait sitting at the London Studio. Shortly retiring from active service, the Commander wanted a record of his Royal Navy career and a portrait which his family will cherish for generations to come.

 (Rory Lewis)

Based in London Rory Lewis is the UK’s foremost Military Portraitist Photographer, who is regularly commissioned to photograph high profile Military Officers for all three branches of the Military Army, RAF & Royal Navy. Portraits are very important to military personal, to be captured in Uniform looking ones best and in full finery can fill one with pride for the service. Rory Lewis Photographer offers a comprehensive service to Members of the Armed Forces, RAF, Royal Navy and Army who are looking to capture a professional portrait. Read More…..

 

 (Rory Lewis) (Rory Lewis)

Captain Buddhi Bhandari MVO Portrait Sitting

SoldieryBritish Army Portraits, has given me a great deal of exposure. Since the completion of the project I have been offering portraits to Military and Police personnel. One of my latest commissions took place with Gurkha Engineer, Captain Buddhi Bhandari MVO, who recently won the Royal Victorian Order for brave actions during the recent Nepal Earthquake.

 

Capturing a portrait of a living hero gave me the chance to record Buddhi, in this another glorious chapter in Gurkha history. If you are a member of the Armed Forces or the Police Services, please don’t hesitate to contact me. Offering portrait sittings in London, Liverpool and Edinburgh.

 

British Army Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

British Army Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Soldiery British Army Portraits The National Army Museum 31st January 2018

Two years in the making and Soldiery British Army Portraits opened at The National Army Museum in London on 31st January 2018. It was wonderful to finally hang the work in its rightful home. The event was attended by dozens of guests from sitters who posed for the project to VIP’s and members of the Public. After a reception the guests enjoyed a talk about the project by myself and General Sir James Everard, KCB, CBE.

Soldiery British Army Portraits National Army Museum 31st January 2018

Delighted to show the final work to the Public I listened to their opinions and explained the inspiration behind the portraits. I also had the chance to reconnect with several of the sitters who attended the evening. Now the project is complete I feel sad it’s actually over. Soldiery was a highly enjoyable experience, working with the incredible men and women of The British Army. The exhibition hung till the 14th February engaging 100’s of visitors with my portraiture.

Soldiery British Army Portraits National Army Museum 31st January 2018

Soldiery British Army Portraits National Army Museum 31st January 2018

General Sir James Everard, KCB, CBE (Left), Rory Lewis Photographer (Right)

 

General Sir Nick Carter, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Portrait Sitting

My latest Portrait commission from the British Army took place with General Sir Nick Carter, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Chief of the General Staff. The General was in need of a portrait to be placed on the wall of former army leaders. The sitting was indeed very historical as the portrait will be viewed by the General’s successors for many years to come. My aim was to capture the General, as the man he is, a leader, no vanity, no pomp of the dress uniform, tall and proud. I’m looking forward to seeing how the portrait is received.

General Sir Nicholas Carter, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Military Portrait Commission

Captain O’Connor of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards recently booked a military portrait sitting at the London Studio. Ever since my Soldiery Portrait Exhibition I have enjoyed receiving commissions; from British Army, Royal Airforce and Royal Navy personnel. I offer a comprehensive photoshoot to Members of the Armed Forces. Available at studios in London, Edinburgh and Liverpool.

London British Army Portrait Photographer

Based in London Rory Lewis is the UK’s foremost Military Portraitist Photographer, who is regularly commissioned to photograph high profile Military Officers for all three branches of the Military Army, RAF & Royal Navy. Portraits are very important to military personal, to be captured in Uniform looking ones best and in full finery can fill one with pride for the service.


(Discounts Available for Large Groups) for Quote Email Me rorylewis@me.com or Call 07717 139 637  For

Field Marshal The Lord Guthrie Portrait Sitting

Soldiery as a project, has given me the opportunity to indulge my historical ambitions. One of these creative urges has been to photograph a British Field Marshal.

 

Field Marshal is the most senior rank of the British Army. Higher than all the Generals I’ve captured thus far. Considered a five star rank in today’s modern militaries. In the British Army, Field Marshal has been the most senior rank since 1736.

 

Since the end of Empire, the rank has become somewhat redundant, this is due to the reduction in the size of Britain’s Armed Forces. The rank is now ceremonial, a gift of recognition from the sovereign to senior military figures, and bestowed on members of the Royal Family.

 

I wrote to several Field Marshal’s and to my delight a reply, Field Marshal The Lord Guthrie accepted my invitation to sit for a Portrait in London.

 

Field Marshal Guthrie, Baron Guthrie of CraigiebankGCBLVOOBEDL was Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, from 1994 to 1997 and Chief of the Defence Staff from 1997 until his retirement in 2001.

Field Marshal The Lord Guthrie Portrait Sitting, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Guthrie’s military career saw service with the Welsh Guards and the Special Air Service; he was closely involved in military operations in Northern Ireland and provided advice to the British Government during the Bosnian War and the Kosovo War.

 

In 2012 Lord Guthrie was handed his Field Marshal’s Baton, in recognition of his remarkable leadership and service by Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II . You can view a Pathe News Clip of another Field Marshal Jan Smuts being handed his Baton back in 1941.

(Below Field Marshals Baton Presented to Field Marshal Jan Smuts OM, CH, ED, PC, KC, FRS)

The Baton is the main symbol of office, only given to Field Marshals. It stems back to ancient origins; namely those of the Roman Empire. A short heavy white Baton was a symbol of  the Imperial Mandate given to Roman Military Legates. The Legate would hold the baton upon high, proclaiming, “above your head and mine to represent the power of the emperor”.

 

The British Field Marshal’s Baton is a symbol of the magnitude of office. The figure of St George and the Dragon is at the top, and at the bottom an inscription from The Queen to Lord Guthrie. The body of the Baton is covered with red velvet.

 

Field Marshal The Lord Guthrie Portrait Sitting, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Looking for inspiration I started with Sir Thomas Lawrence, studying his portraits of the Duke of Wellington.  Neo Classical in Style; Lawrence painted the Iron Duke on several occasions. His most vivid depiction, a triumphant portrait of Wellington which dominates the Waterloo Chamber at Windsor Castle. Lawrence’s composition is that of victory, heralding Wellington as the finest of military commanders and the liberator of Europe.

Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830)
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) 1814-15

Then I moved on to looking at Singer Sargent’s portrait of Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts. The work similar to Sir Thomas Lawrence’s neo-classical depictions.  I turned to photography, browsing the National Portrait Gallery archive, I discovered the photographer Alexander Bassano, who photographed Field Marshal Hague. The portrait captured in a solemn and dutiful style, the depictions relay the finery, yet the obligation and commitment of Hague’s role.

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig by Bassano Ltd whole-plate glass negative, 19 July 1921 Alexander Bassano

With all this in mind I set to work, with a desire to create my own interpretation. Using a red velvet backdrop, I aimed to recreate the symbolism of the fire and blood, that is the Red Coat. The British Military Uniform associated with energy, war, danger, strength and Royal power. These words associate with the office of Field Marshal. Full finery was the order of the day, medals, orders, and number one dress uniform. Wanting to portray Lord Guthrie as the man he is; the Commander held in immense regard.

 

The positions directed for the sitting are reflective, shooting from a low angle to make Lord Guthrie look prominent and tall. Harsh lighting is utilised to preserve the detail. To me the Portrait is historical , a document, all the detail must be safeguarded. With this in mind I hope I’ve done my predecessors, proud in this my first portrait sitting with a British Field Marshal. Currently I’m accepting public & private commissions both Military and Non Military for Portrait Sittings so please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)

Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry London Portrait Sittings

A company of the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry took up the temporary role of mounting the Queen’s Guard at Buckingham Palace last month. The honour usually falls to the British Army’s Household Division. However, other Commonwealth Nations get a chance at protecting the Queen every now and again. Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry is based in Shilo, Manitoba, Canada. Named after Princess Patricia of Connaught, daughter of the then-Governor General of Canada. Contacting the regiment upon their arrival in London. I arranged a series of portrait sittings with the company at Wellington Barracks, before they mounted the Queens Guard. The sitting gave me the chance to record living History, Canadian Regiments rarely appear in London for state duties.

HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)

 

The 2PPCLI uniforms differ slightly to British Soldiers, especially their helmets. They are called Pith helmets, and the choice of helmet style comes down to historical precedent specific to each regiment. You may also notice that the helmets the officers wear are entirely white, while the non-commissioned members have a coloured fabric on theirs. In the case of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, that colour is ‘French Grey’ which is the colour of the Third Canadian Division.

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Accustomed to photographing British Soldiers for my ‘Soldiery Portrait Exhibition‘ it was refreshing to work with a Canadian Regiment. A real pleasure to work with the chaps. Its true what they say, Canadians are among the most polite people in the world.

 

HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)