Rambahadur Limbu VC Portrait Sitting

The Victoria Cross & George Cross Portrait Project has been an exceptionally challenging, yet rewarding portraiture project. Individuals who have been awarded the Victoria Cross have been selected because they are worthy of Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand’s highest military award for their bravery and conduct in the field. Similarly, those awarded the George Cross are civilians or military personnel who have displayed conspicuous bravery in and away from the field. These awards are not issued lightly. They are the very greatest honour for individual valour and merit. These individuals are the modern day heroes.

 

Over the next few week’s I’ll be posting all the VC & GC recipients in a series of Blog Posts. Here is my Fourth post in the series, recipient Rambahadur Limbu, VC, MVO. (View Full Series of Posts)

 

Rambahadur Limbu VC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

 

Extracts from citation

“On 21st November 1965 in the Bau District of Sarawak Lance Corporal RAMBAHADUR LIMBU was with his Company when they discovered and attacked a strong enemy force located in the Border area… Leading his support group in the van of the attack he could see the nearest trench and in it a sentry manning a machine gun. Determined to gain first blood he inched himself forward until… he was seen and the sentry opened fire, immediately wounding a man to his right. Rushing forward he reached the enemy trench… and killed the sentry, thereby gaining for the attacking force a foothold on the objective… with a complete disregard for the hail of fire he got together and led his fire group to a better fire position…

 

…he saw both men of his own group seriously wounded… and… immediately commenced… to rescue his comrades… he crawled forward, in full view of at least two enemy machine gun posts who concentrated their fire on him… but… was driven back by the accurate and intense… fire… After a pause he started again…

 

Rushing forward he hurled himself on the ground beside one of the wounded and calling for support from two light machine guns… he picked up the man and carried him to safety… Without hesitation he immediately returned… [for the other] wounded man [and] carried him back… through the hail of enemy bullets. It had taken twenty minutes to complete this gallant action and the events leading up to it. For all but a few seconds this Non-Commissioned Officer had been moving alone in full view of the enemy and under the continuous aimed fire of their automatic weapons… His outstanding personal bravery, selfless conduct, complete contempt of the enemy and determination to save the lives of the men of his fire group set an incomparable example and inspired all who saw him.

 

Finally, Lance Corporal Rambahadur was responsible for killing four more enemy as they attempted to escape…

 

He displayed heroism, self sacrifice and a devotion to duty and to his men of the very highest order. His actions on this day reached a zenith of determined, premeditated valour which must count amongst the most notable on record and is deserving of the greatest admiration and the highest praise.”

The Sea Lord’s

Recently I had the honor of photographing a very historic series of portrait sittings. Commissioned by The Royal Navy. To Photograph the outgoing First Sea Lord Admiral Sir George Zambellas. The sittings took place at Admiralty House in Portsmouth. I was also able to capture portraits of the First Sea Lord’s Staff. Second Sea Lord Vice Admiral Jonathan Woodcock, Flag Lieutenant (Capt Sam Shepherd GC) and Master Seaman Rob Martin.

 

Embarrassingly this was my first visit to the Naval Port City. Surrounded by the History, Admiralty House is a stones-throw away from the iconic HMS Victory and the vast array of the Royal Navy’s powerful arsenal of Warships. The Portrait sittings were very enjoyable, and I took inspiration from the feast of Naval Portraits hanging on the walls in Admiralty House.

Admiral Sir George Michael Zambellas, GCB, DSC, ADC, DL, FRAeS Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer

Admiral Sir George Michael Zambellas, GCB, DSC, ADC, DL, FRAeS Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer

Vice Admiral Simon Jonathan Woodcock, OBE, Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer

Vice Admiral Simon Jonathan Woodcock, OBE, Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer

Flag Lieutenant (Capt Sam Shepherd GC) London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Flag Lieutenant (Capt Sam Shepherd GC) London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Master Seaman Rob Martin, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Master Seaman Rob Martin, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Victoria & George Cross Portraits

Recently I was honored to be commissioned by the Victoria & George Cross Association to capture portraits of those who have been decorated with Britain and the Commonwealths Highest Orders for Bravery for both Military and Civilian actions. The commission has been exceptionally challenging; the recipients who live all over the globe from Nepal and Canada to New Zealand & Australia. The project is underway and has clocked up the air miles taking me across the globe to capture the men and women who have been posthumously decorated for exceptional bravery.

 

The stories of valor; selfless courage and fearlessness I have read are incredible and to meet living heroes is indescribable. These men and women have saved lives at the risk of their own; held their ground under immense pressure and injury to themselves. I wanted to post just a few of the tales of valor, if you would like to view the full collection please see my project page.

 

Johnson Beharry VC

Lance Sergeant Johnson Gideon Beharry VC (born 26 July 1979) is a British Army soldier who, on 18 March 2005, was awarded the Victoria Cross. On 1 May 2004, Beharry was driving a Warrior tracked armoured vehicle that had been called to the assistance of a foot patrol caught in a series of ambushes. The Warrior was hit by multiple rocket propelled grenades, causing damage and resulting in the loss of radio communications. The platoon commander, the vehicle’s gunner and a number of other soldiers in the vehicle were injured. Due to damage to his periscope optics, Pte. Beharry was forced to open his hatch to steer his vehicle, exposing his face and head to withering small arms fire. Beharry drove the crippled Warrior through the ambush, taking his own crew and leading five other Warriors to safety. He then extracted his wounded comrades from the vehicle, all the time exposed to further enemy fire. He was cited on this occasion for “valour of the highest order”.

 

While back on duty on 11 June 2004, Beharry was again driving the lead Warrior of his platoon through Al Amarah when his vehicle was ambushed. A rocket propelled grenade hit the vehicle six inches from Beharry’s head, and he received serious shrapnel injuries to his face and brain. Other rockets then hit the vehicle, incapacitating his commander and injuring several of the crew. Despite his life-threatening injuries, Beharry retained control of his vehicle and drove it out of the ambush area before losing consciousness. He required brain surgery for his head injuries, and he was still recovering in March 2005 when he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

 

Peter Norton (GC)

Peter Norton (GC) London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Peter Norton (GC) London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Norton was second-in-command of the American Combined Explosives Exploitation Cell (CEXC) based in the outskirts of Baghdad. Going to the aid of a United States Army patrol that had been attacked by an improvised explosive device (IED) on 24 July 2005, he was checking for the presence of further devices when a secondary victim-operated IED exploded. He lost his left leg and part of his left arm, and he sustained serious injuries to his other leg and lower back. Despite his injuries, he continued to give instructions to his team, suspecting that further devices might be in the vicinity. He refused to be evacuated until he was certain that all personnel on the ground were aware of the danger. A third device was subsequently located and dealt with the following day. He was promoted to major on 31 July 2008. On 1 August 2013, Norton retired from the army on medical grounds.

 

Margaret Vaughan GC

Margaret Vaughan GC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Margaret Vaughan GC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

May 28th, 1949, a party of Scouts, aged between 11 and 15 years, visiting Sully Island were cut off by the rising tide from a causeway which led to the mainland. Most of the boys got safely across, but two of them were forced off the causeway by the strong tide. The leader of the party returned to help the elder boy but in the struggle he too became exhausted. Margaret Vaughan (aged 14 years) saw from the beach the difficulties they were in. She undressed and swam towards them over a distance of some 30 yards in cold, rough water and against strong currents due to the rising tide. On reaching them she towed the boy to the shore while he supported himself by grasping the straps of her costume and his leader’s coat. At about ten feet from the shore a life belt was thrown in which the boy was placed by the other two and the three reached the shore safely. Margaret Vaughan’s action probably saved the life of the Scout leader as well as that of the elder boy.

 

Jim Beaton VC

Jim Beaton GC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Jim Beaton GC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Beaton received the George Cross in 1974 for protecting The Princess Anne from the would-be kidnapper Ian Ball during an attack in The Mall, London. He received the Director’s Honor Award of the United States Secret Service in the same year. He was made an LVO in 1987 and promoted to CVO in 1992.

 

In March 1973, Beaton was transferred to the Royalty Protection Squad, A Division, and from 14 November served as a Personal Protection Officer to Princess Anne. He was given the number 11 in the small team responsible for protecting members of the Royal Family. On 20 March 1974 the princess and her husband Captain Mark Phillips were returning to Buckingham Palace from a royal engagement. Their car was stopped in the Mall by another vehicle driven into its path.The car was driven by Ian Ball, who was later declared to be mentally ill; Ball jumped out of his vehicle and tried to force the Princess from her car. He shot the royal chauffeur, Alex Callender, and a passing journalist, Brian McConnell, who tried to assist. Inspector Beaton was shot three times, including serious wounds in the chest and abdomen, and a gunshot wound to his hand, sustained when he tried to block Ball’s weapon with his own body, after his own gun had jammed. Beaton also sustained injuries to his pelvis while trying to disarm Ball. For his bravery Beaton was awarded the George Cross; Callender and McConnell were each awarded the Queen’s Gallantry Medal. Beaton remained with the Princess until February 1979.

 

Captain Rambahadur Limbu VC 

Captain Rambahadur Limbu VC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Captain Rambahadur Limbu VC London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Limbu was 26 years old, and was a lance corporal in the 2nd Battalion, 10th Princess Mary’s Own Gurkha Rifles, British Army during the Indonesian Confrontation when, on 21 November 1965 in Sarawak, Borneo, Lance Corporal Rambahadur Limbu was in an advance party of 16 Gurkhas when they encountered about 30 Indonesians holding a position on the top of a jungle-covered hill. The lance-corporal went forward with two men, but when they were only 10 yards from the enemy machine-gun position, the sentry opened fire on them, whereupon Limbu rushed forward and killed him with a grenade. The remaining enemy combatants then opened fire on the small party, wounding the two men with the lance-corporal who, under heavy fire, made three journeys into the open, two to drag his comrades to safety and one to retrieve their Bren gun, with which he charged down and killed many of the enemy.

 

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Soldiery – Capturing British Army Generals

One of my current projects is entitled ‘Soldiery’. It’s an exciting, interesting and challenging project in which I’m working in collaboration with the British Army to capture a truly unique collection of military portraiture.

 

Soldiery has taken a year to complete and has seen me visiting a dozen regiments from the Queen’s Royal Lancers, to the Household Cavalry, Gurkhas and Parachute Regiment. There have been over 250 portrait sittings that have seen me march the length and breadth of the country. Over this past year, I’ve been in military bases as far apart as Scotland’s Fort George in Inverness, to Catterick Yorkshire, Buckingham Palace, Horse Guards, the MOD Headquarters in Whitehall and Army Headquarters in Andover.

2nd Duke of Lancasters Regiment Lt Colonel Hamish Cormack

2nd Duke of Lancasters Regiment Lt Colonel Hamish Cormack

The aim of Soldiery has been to capture the ‘greats’ of our military in a portrait collection which will serve as historical record of the British Army in the early 21st Century. This is living history, and includes several of the Army’s Generals and the senior staff of the British Army.

 

The Challenges 

I asked myself, as a humble civilian, how best to approach the portrait sittings. These figures are eminent people of stature and rank. What was the protocol? What style of portraiture would be best suited?

Lt Colonel Steel (3SCOTS The Black Watch) (Left) Lt Colonel Clayton (Royal Welsh Regiment)

Lt Colonel Steel (3SCOTS The Black Watch) (Left) Lt Colonel Clayton (Royal Welsh Regiment)

Photographers are, in many ways, like a chameleon. We adapt to our environment as we are a facilitator. As you may know, my inspiration is often drawn from historical portrait paintings of the past. I went back to my roots, channelled my inner history buff, and began reminding myself of military paintings of the Napoleonic period. 

Very quickly I stumbled upon the works of the celebrated George Dawe. His style laid the foundations of my style for the project. With a staggering 342 portraits of Russian Generals to peruse I wasn’t short of inspiration. He was a busy and incredibly talented artist – in an 18 month period he had painted 80 Generals to be displayed at the Winter Palace having gained the commission during a tour of Europe with his Patrons the Duke and Duchess of Kent.

Alexander-Bibikov & Dmitry Levin George Daw Portrait Artist

Alexander-Bibikov & Dmitry Levin George Dawe Portrait Artist

George Dawe – Inspiration for Modern Military Portraiture

From British shores, Dawe relocated to St Petersburg in 1819. He rapidly won acclaim for his work and also received complimentary poetry verses by Pushkin entitled ‘To Dawe Esq.’ His work is on display at the Hermitage in St Petersburg.  In fact, he became somewhat of a celebrity throughout Europe, mixing with the Russian intellectual elite, even gaining an invitation to the coronation of Nicholas I in 1826. By 1828 he had been officially appointed First Portrait Painter of the Imperial Court. 

For me, perusing his work, it’s the subject’s heroism and responsibility that left its mark. This is what I wanted to capture in my project with a lens, rather than a brush.

Alexander Balashov & Alexander Seslavin George Dawe Portrait Artist

Alexander Balashov & Alexander Seslavin George Dawe Portrait Artist

Military Sittings Began – Lt. General Mark Poffley

 First up was Lt. General Mark Poffley O.B.E at the M.O.D London Headquarters in White Hall. Poffley was commissioned into the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1985 and has since served in the British Army for 31 years. He has been deployed in every major conflict in the past three decades from The Gulf War, Bosnian War, Insurgency in the Republic of Macedonia, War in Afghanistan and the Iraq War.

Lt General Mark Poffley, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Lt General Mark Poffley, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

So began my aim to capture the Lt. General as a leader, an implacable Napoleonic Hero in Dawe’s inspirational style. Once the shoot was underway I requested the General to clutch his sword as I shot from a lower angle. With eyes to the camera I was able to direct, and capture, a fierce yet responsible expression.

 

My second sitting took place with Lt General Sir James Everard Commander Army Land Forces, this time at Army Head Quarters in Andover. Everard is a veteran of many campaigns and has seen action in Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq & Afghanistan. With Dawe’s inspiration at my fingertips I directed the General to pose profile allowing a full display of his medals and battle honours, with sword held close. I requested a responsible yet solemn expression looking to provoke the same thoughts in the viewers of my photographs as Dawe succeeded with his painting.

Lt General Sir James Everard, Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Lt General Sir James Everard, Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

For historical recording, the sword is of critical importance. It is only part of the dress uniform for Generals who have received a 3-Star rank or above. The swords come from the Sovereign.

 

A tall and imposing man, Lt. General Bashall was photographed at the General’s Headquarters in Aldershot. The General is one of the British Army’s most veteran combat commanders, justifiably proud of his service with the Parachute Regiment.

Lieutenant General James Ian Bashall CBE Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Lieutenant General James Ian Bashall CBE Military Portraits, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

In order to fully capture and capitalise upon the General’s stature, I opted for a half-length portrait. Key this time was to capture his ‘wings’, the symbol of the Paratroopers.

 

Major General Sanders is commander of the 3rd UK Division or ‘Iron Division’. It is the job of the Iron Division to respond to the call to field an army, whenever needed. The result is that General Sanders plays a crucial role as a combat commander. Previously a member of the Rifle Regiment, the General is no stranger to the field of combat. Direction this time involved instructing his eyes to focus on the camera with me shooting from a lower point. The result is a portrait capturing a powerful yet thoughtful figure.

Major General Patrick Sanders, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Major General Patrick Sanders, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

The final General of the collection was Major General Bob Bruce, commander of the Royal Regiment of Scotland. I needed to display tradition in this portrait with Bruce captured in his traditional Scottish uniform. Profile to camera enabled me to capture his regimental badge and his feather plume in all its glory. I used lighting techniques to separate him from the backdrop, creating a split of light on the unseen part of his facial profile.

Major General Bob Bruce, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Major General Bob Bruce, London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

From these sittings with senior military figures I have learned a great deal about capturing leadership. I have found myself directing prominent individuals who are used to themselves giving direction to the men and women they command. I have relished the chance to take responsibility and ownership for these historical images of senior military leaders. These portraits will stand the test of time.

 

Relying once again on my confidence as a portrait photographer, I was able to bring to the sittings the direction needed to draw on Dawe’s inspiration. This confidence is key to any of my sittings, both military and in other fields where I need to capture leaders: from business to government.  Whilst Soldiery is complete, the lessons I’ve learned will follow through to all my future portrait sittings.

 

 

Major John Melville Military Portrait Sitting

Major John Melville late of the Commandos and now serving in The Royal Artillery commissioned a Military Portrait at Barracks in Liverpool. It was wonderful to meet John and great to speak to him about his incredible career. Melville is a soldier of considerable experience serving through the ranks as an enlisted man all the way to becoming an officer. His service in the military spanning from the Falklands Conflict in 1982 to the Gulf War in 1990 and even the recent conflicts in Iraq 2003 & Afghanistan 2001–14.

 

Portraits are very important to military personal, to be captured in Uniform looking ones best and in full finery can fill one with pride for the service. John is a genuine British Hero and I wanted to capture him as thus, opting for tall, solemn yet dutiful poses. He was very proud of his service in the Commandos and opted for his portrait in the Iconic Green Commando Beret.

 

If you are a member of the armed forces looking for a portrait siting please check out my comprehensive service available UK wide and several times a year in Los Angeles USA.

HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)

HyperFocal: 0 (Rory Lewis)

Rory Lewis: The One Stop Shop for Headshots

Beth Tweddle Portrait Rory Lewis PhotographerIt’s a big wild world out there when seeking headshots, whether you’re an actor, business leader, politician or anyone seeking a portrait photo for professional purposes. Sorting the wheat from the chaff and being sure you’re going to get exactly what you need, on professional level, can be overwhelming. You need someone who knows your home turf, with a specialist North-West headshot photographer covering Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds, but who knows how to play the headshot game, getting exactly what you are looking for from your final images: professionalism; confidence; your Unique Selling Point conveyed. You need someone who has the confidence and experience of working with both celebrities and those looking to make their name alike, capable of shooting the best of anyone.

Headshot Photography: Why a One Stop Shop, One Man Band?

 

Corporate Headshots Liverpool, London, Manchester, Leeds, Glasgow

It’s easy to be bowled over and hoodwinked by a large national photography studio with a corporate image and multiple photographers. The downside is, you don’t know who you’re going to get or the exact quality of their work. With a One Man Band, like Rory Lewis Photographer, globally experienced yet locally based in the North West across Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds, you know exactly what you’re getting. My image as an individual matters, so I capture your image professionally, yet creatively. A One Man Band focusses on you and you alone, each and every client matters.

Political Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Political Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Headshot Photography North-West UK: Why Rory Lewis?

 

I am not a general photographer, but a highly experienced Portrait Photographer with over 10 years’ headshot experience. I have a proven track record working with celebrities, corporate clients, models, upcoming actors and actresses, politicians, and all manner of walks of life. Exhibiting at the National Portrait Gallery, with names such as Sir Patrick Stewart, Sir Ian McKellan, Sir Derek Jacobi, David Warner, Iain Glen and Julian Glover, I feel confident in my headshot reputation.

This enables me to ensure that your session is relaxed, and entirely focussed on you and what you need from your shoot. I understand what is needed across the range of headshot requirements, from child actors to leading politicians, so that I can lead the shoot and guide you to portray yourself to the camera in a way that will capture the essence of the look you are striving for. My sessions are relaxed and informal and truly for everyone. I work with you developing styles, emotions and lighting that is appropriate for your headshots.

Legends of the Stage Portraits Rory Lewis Photographer

Legends of the Stage Portraits Rory Lewis Photographer

Headshots: Who Are The Clients

 

The beauty of choosing a Portraiture Specialist such as Rory Lewis Photography, is that you find a One Stop Shop. Whatever your headshot needs, they can be met. From child actors with their unique needs for easy-going rapport to household names with their well-known personalities, from Corporate Profiles for LinkedIn demonstrating a branded style, to publication-based images for the military, everyone will find a package to suit.

Liverpool Cheap/Discounted Actors Headshot Session Affordable

A vast majority of headshot clients are actors looking for their portfolio images. I have worked with a huge range of actors and actresses across the North West UK from celebrities to newcomers, I am in tune with casting director expectations and I understand the industry. I understand the nerve-wracking difference that can be felt between motion and still photography, and put you at your ease to ensure you are photographed at your best, demonstrating the range of your acting abilities, your potential and confidence.

Lord Mayors of Liverpool Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Lord Mayors of Liverpool Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis

Corporate clients have their own unique requirements. With experience working for large corporate names such as Pepsi, CancerResearch UK, John Lewis and the Ministry of Defence, I understand the need to ensure your corporate headshots seamlessly represent your brand identity and corporate image. The result is polished professional business photos whether the subject is the CEO or entry-level employee. As always, I work to ensure each and every sitting is conducted in a friendly and relaxed manner, bringing out the very best in every photo.

 

Further headshots are required by many different individuals and groups. Military, political and historical figures bring their own unique set of requirements for portrait headshots demonstrating confidence, leadership and power. With experience photographing such eminent individuals such as William Hague and Iain Duncan Smith as well as key figures from the Army, RAF and Navy. Alongside these I have experience undertaking headshots for sports personalities and individuals from a wide range of professions. I understand headshot: what is required, and how to deliver what you need in an affordable, comprehensive, personal and tailored way.

Military Portrait Photographer Liverpool & London

Headshots: One Stop Shop Package Options

 

The realm of headshot photography has become highly complex to those looking from the outside in. Knowing exactly what you are getting and what it will cost you can seem an elusive dream. This is why I believe in allowing my reputation, experience and previous shoots to speak for themselves, alongside simple yet comprehensive packages. This means you can easily choose the North West UK Headshot option that suits you best.

 

To achieve the best looks, you need to be relaxed and at ease. Therefore my sessions are usually around 2 hours: plenty of time to undertake hairstyle and clothing changes as necessary; time to explore studio and natural light (outdoor) shots; relaxed time over a coffee to review images as they are created to repeatedly check-in that we’re getting exactly what we need. The aim of Rory Lewis Portrait Sessions is to give you a tailor-made experience in a straightforward, upfront package. At the end of the session around 500 shots will have been taken, and you’ll quickly receive a reduced amount from which you can choose your favourites. I then believe communication is key and I work with you to touch up these images in line with your headshot requirements.

Portraitist copy

Rory Lewis Photography: Your One Stop Headshot Stop

 

If you’re in the North West, in the regions of Liverpool, Manchester or Leeds, and looking for a headshot shoot then I’m your man. I love what I do and that’s conveyed in all my work. I enjoy working with a vast range of individuals, bringing you what you want and need, within a simple, comprehensive, affordable package that is suitable for everyone.

 

To Book Please Email Me rory@rorylewisphotography.com or Call 07717 139 637  For Availability

 

Lt General Poffley Portrait Sitting

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British ArmyLt General Mark Poffley O.B.E very graciously accepted my invitation to sit for a portrait at the M.O.D London Headquarters in WhiteHall. Poffley was commissioned into the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1985. The General has served in the British Army for 31 years being deployed in every major conflict in the past three decades from The Gulf War, Bosnian War, Insurgency in the Republic of Macedonia, War in Afghanistan and the Iraq War. My aim was to capture a portrait of Poffley as a leader, taking inspiration from Military Portrait Artists such as George Dawe with strong and bold expressions and body language, I also shot from lower angles to emphasise height. If you are in need of a portrait photographer with a historical perspective please contact me for a quote, I am available throughout  the year in the the UK & USA.

 

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

 

Equipment Used

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting

Austrian General & Defense Attaché to UK, Brigadier Günter Eisl commissioned a portrait at the Austrian Embassy in London. I am no stranger to working with members of the British Armed forces; it was a nice change to photograph a soldier from the Austrian Military. Opting for strong and tall poses, I directed the Brigadier as to look solemn, ceremonial, stately and formal; shooting from lower angles to emphasise hight and responsibility of his rank.

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Brigadier Günter Eisl Portrait Sitting (Rory Lewis London Portrait Photographer)

Major General Tim Robinson Portrait Sitting

London Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Military PortraitRetiring from the Army senior military leader Major General Tim Robinson CBE, commissioned a portrait at Army Head quarters in Andover. With a military career spanning two decades, seeing active service and leading troops in Iraq, Bosnia and Northern Ireland. Faced with such a distinguished military sitter I directed the General to assume solemn and reflective poses; as to mirror his achievements and responsibilities. The General really enjoyed the experience and was fascinated by my lighting and directional methods.

 

Portraits are very important to military personal, to be captured in Uniform looking ones best and in full finery can fill one with pride for the service. I offer a compressive service to Members of the Armed Forces, RAFRoyal Navy and Army who are looking to capture a professional portrait. Available at studios in Central London and in Central Liverpool; or on Location.

 (Rory Lewis) (Rory Lewis)

London Portrait Photographer– Capturing the Essence of Power

William Jefferson Hague FRSL (born 26 March 1961)[1] is a British Conservative politician who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Richmond (Yorks) from 1989 to 2015. He also served as Leader of the House of Commons from 2014 to 2015, as Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs from 2010 to 2014,[2] and as Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition from 1997 to 2001. (Rory Lewis)

William Jefferson Hague Baron Of Richmond (Rory Lewis Photographer 2015)

As a London Portrait Photographer you learn very quickly. A picture does speak a thousand words, but not so when it comes to History Portrait Photography. These pictures need only speak two words: authenticity and power. When it comes to this style of photography the photographer needs to play by the rules: rules that are subtle to grasp, comprehend and activate, making the game difficult to play. Yet the end result needs to look effortless. Such photos are one of the truest documents of history and society, particularly for those holding positions of power and influence in the beating power centre of London – but also elsewhere.

 

Lt General James Everard (Rory Lewis Photographer 2015) Normally two characters are displayed in portraiture: the character of the subject and the character of the photographer. The photographer is aiming to capture the mood, expression and personality of subject. With History Portraiture, the photographer needs to take an apparent backseat, becoming invisible to the end result, presenting objectivity which enables the viewer their own subjectivity. This is a skill, an art form in itself – to appear to effortlessly capture through artistic ability the true appearance of the sitter, the authentic appearance, whilst exuding power. The result should be a deep and detailed portrait, yet a blank slate on which can rest the viewer’s own opinions. (Lt General James Everard Left)

 

I have an understated passion for Modern History Portrait Photography. In my time studying History at Kings College, London, I spent my days pondering on numerous historical figures gazing down on me and providing the inner voice of judgement on my student-lifestyle. I became fascinated by the pictures, searching for the 1000 words but finding just the two. I -had to do the understanding, the opinion-forming, no lazy back-of-the lecture-theatre effort allowed here. I found myself asking: what motivated the artist? Did the sitter approve, like, or dislike the artist’s representation? Were the portraits politically driven for propaganda or were they true to history?

 

I feel privileged to combine this passion, this appreciation of these individual’s place in history by becoming a photographer, called upon to utilise my expertise in lighting techniques, direction and even inventive scenarios to capture some of the most key people of our age.

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

Military Portrait Photographer Rory Lewis Lt General Mark Poffley British Army

Baron William Hague (Rory Lewis London Portrait PhotographerIn these shoots, here is a clear need to guarantee authority, the exemplary status, and in some cases the immortality of the sitter. These portraits need to stand the test of time like no other. To achieve this air of power and authority, the photographer needs to set the individual in a plain, yet solemn expression. The photographer is neutral, the sitter a vessel of unadorned vigour. How does this look in reality? This portrait of Baron William Hague of Richmond, commissioned just after the General Election of 2015 when Hague announced his retirement from politics, is a perfect example. The usually affable and jovial character portrayed in the media has instead been replaced with true authenticity and exudes the aura of a powerful political figure with a career spanning 30 years. I have kept the portrait neutral to allow you, the viewer, to make up your own mind and to form your own opinions.

 

Rory Lewis Photographer, London Portrait Photographer, General Nick HoughtonSimilarly this atmosphere of power can be seen in my portrait of General Sir Nicholas Houghton, Chief of Defence Staff, which was published in the Telegraph Newspaper. The commission came from the Ministry of Defence, looking for a portrait which can be used across a range official publications. As is often important when working with subjects who have busy agendas and high-profile responsibilities, the shoot was brought to the heart of power in Whitehall itself. My role, the game I needed to play, involved directing the General in order to project an air of solemnity whilst holding a plain expression. The result is an authoritative yet commanding portrait of this modern day historical figure. The image fits the historical context of military portraiture: a juxtaposition of simplicity and complexity.

 

Iain Duncan Smith London Portrait Photographer Rory LewisAt a recent London Portrait Sitting with Iain Duncan-Smith I dodged the ball of political controversy to remain true to the elements of the history portrait. The public, along with current and future historians, will have their own opinion, my role is to allow this judgement to be formed and to sit comfortably with the image portrayed. The viewer can subconsciously overlay their own viewpoint on the portrait.My aim is to allow my integral presence in the shoot become invisible in the end result, allowing the portrait to become a blank canvas for the viewer’s opinion. I aim, from behind the camera and through directing the shoot, to place these eminent figures elegantly yet timelessly in to their place in history.